The effects of exposure to chemicals

Here are some terms that explain the health effects of exposure to chemicals.   Term Acute toxicity

Written by gillian

Here are some terms that explain the health effects of exposure to chemicals.

 

Term

Acute toxicity

An adverse health effect following a single exposure to a chemical (e.g. skin contact with insecticides, accidental ingestion of a chemical).

 

Carcinogen

A chemical that causes or can potentially cause cancer (e.g. breathing in asbestos fibres, skin contact with used motor oils).

Chronic toxicity

An adverse health effect following repeated exposure to a chemical, which can occur following a relatively short exposure (e.g. weeks) or longer term exposure (e.g. years). 

CMR

A chemical that is Carcinogenic, Mutagenic or Toxic to Reproduction.

 

Corrosive

A chemical that causes irreversible damage to skin, eyes or airways (e.g. strong acids and strong bases such as concentrated hydrochloric acid or concentrated hydroxides).

Irritant A

Chemical that causes reversible damage to skin, eyes or airways (e.g. detergents or soaps).

Mutagen

A chemical that can cause permanent damage to genetic material in cells, which can possibly lead to heritable genetic damage or cancer (e.g. UV rays from the sun, benzene).

Reproductive toxin

A chemical that can affect adult male or female reproductive systems, their ability to reproduce and/or that can lead to birth defects (e.g. lead or carbon monoxide).

Respiratory sensitiser

A chemical that can cause an allergic reaction in the airways following inhalation of the chemical (e.g. glutaraldehyde or isocyanate).

Skin sensitiser

A chemical that can cause an allergic reaction of the skin following skin contact (e.g. wood dust or adhesives)

 

 

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